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Alternate titles: Mirroring.

Problem summary

We learn by comparing our behavior with the actions of others

Usage

  • Use to help users learn a new behavior

This card is part of the Persuasive Patterns printed card deck

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Solution

  • Use your customer’s own words. Learn what language works best and how to better engage interested prospects.
  • Lead the way. Demonstrate and encourage positive interactions and behaviors that users can observe and mimic.
  • Highlight good behavior. In social contexts, find and reward people who model good behavior to let the crowd know what normal (or intended) behavior is.

Rationale

We often subconsciously and automatically imitate other people’s behavior. You smile when I smile. Mimic your customer’s terminologies, reuse search queries in your online dialogues, and showcase actual consumers buying or consuming your product.

Discussion

Positive mimicry plays a major role in psychotherapy as a tool to positively influence relationship to the client as well as a way to communicate empathy, to enhance similarity between interaction partners and increase their liking.

Sources

Positive mimicry plays a major role in psychotherapy as a tool to positively influence relationship to the client as well as a way to communicate empathy, to enhance similarity between interaction partners and increase their liking.

1 Hess, U., Philippot, P., & Blairy, S. (1999). Mimicry: Facts and fiction. In P. Philippot, R. S. Feldman, & E. J. Coats (Eds.), The social context of nonverbal behavior (pp. 213–241). Cambridge University Press

2 Agneta H. Fischer, Daniela Becker and Lotte Veenstra (2012), Emotional mimicry in social context: the case of disgust and pride, Department of Social Psychology, University of Amsterdam


User Interface Design Patterns